Tuesday, 26 July 2016

71 Great Websites to Find Freelance Jobs






71 Great Websites to Find Freelance Jobs


freelance jobs
I’ve been working online for four years now, and I’m still amazed by how many freelancing sites are available. It’s truly remarkable.
When I first started, I relied on one site for all of my work because I earned enough money to pay the bills. Once I started branching out though, I was able to get significantly higher paying freelance jobs, many of which required less time than what I was already spending on work.
That was a huge win.
And now I’d like to help you land awesome and creative jobs by branching out to the various online sites. I’ve compiled a list of 71 different sites, three I’ll cover in depth plus 68 more sources – so you’ll know where to start. Here are some great places online to find work as a freelancer.

1. Upwork (Formerly oDesk)

odesk-freelance-jobs
Upwork will forever be my favorite freelancing site because this is the one I first started getting work from. It has jobs for beginners to professionals, with clients and employees from all around the world.
You’ll see plenty of low-budget jobs on here, but you can also find great clients who are willing to pay well.

How It Works:

Simply sign up for an account on the site, and you can browse through thousands of job postings.
Search by category based on your skills, and fill out applications for anything you like. If you get interviewed or hired, you can track your hours or project status on Upwork and then get paid directly through the site.

Do:

  • Fill out your entire profile, with samples and references. Clients may contact you about jobs, so you need to make your profile as enticing as possible.
  • Take multiple tests. You will have to take the Upwork Readiness Test before you can apply for jobs, but then you should take others related to your skills. This shows clients what you can really do.
  • Link a withdrawal option to your account. This takes a long time to set up, so you should get it going while you work on your first project.
  • Include a cover letter for every job you apply to. This of applying for these jobs just as you would a regular 9-to-5 gig.

Don’t:

  • Request upfront payment. Without any experience or feedback on the site, no one is going to trust you to just give you their money.
  • Get discouraged if you don’t get a job right away. You may have to take something cheaper than expected to gain experience and feedback.
  • Forget to leave feedback after a project is complete. When you leave yours, your client’s will show up on your profile.
  • Be afraid to apply for something different. Some of the best jobs I’ve ever gotten were for topics I had to learn more about.
Final takeaway: Upwork is a great site to start off with, and it still provides steady income for the pros. I’ve stuck with it for four years for a reason. It works.

2. Craigslist

craigslist-freelance-jobs
Wait, what? I thought Craigslist was only for buying and trading random stuff in the neighborhood…?
Believe it or not, Craigslist is actually a fantastic source for freelancing jobs. I have found five of my top ten highest paying clients through Craigslist. That’s because I’ve developed a system, which I’ll explain below.

How it Works:

You can either choose the city you live in from the list, or you can select one of the major cities in your country. I use the U.S. cities list that pops up on the right-hand side once you actually go into a city’s page.
Check both the “jobs” section and “gigs” section for each city.
Freelance writers look in writing—developers look in web/info design, etc. Read the posts and follow the instructions for applying. If there are none, send an email with a cover letter and resume to the address next to “Reply to this post” at the top.
If you hear back, you can proceed like you would a regular job interview.

Do:

  • Look in as many cities as possible. I check all of the U.S., Europe, and Canada when I apply for jobs.
  • Read each post carefully. Some give you words to put in your email to make sure you read the whole thing.
  • Include links or attachments with your work. That way employers can see what you can do and how well you do it..

Don’t:

  • Go back too far in the postings. I usually limit my searches to the past week, and then I move on to another city.
  • Sort by telecommute. Even though this would be logical to do for freelance work, many clients don’t click that option for their posts. You may miss out if you limit your search this way.
Final takeaway: Craigslist isn’t the obvious choice for freelancing jobs, but it can lead you to some extraordinary opportunities online. Best part of all—you don’t have to pay anything to use it.

68 Other Freelance Jobs Sites to Check Out

Need more than a couple of options to land your next freelance client? Well, don’t worry: I’ve got you covered. After a bit of research and online digging, I’ve come across 68 more freelancing sites and job boards for you to find the freelance jobs of your dreams.

A Bit for Everyone:

For Writers and Editors:

For Designers and Programmers:


About the author: Heaven Stubblefield is a wife, writer, and self-proclaimed know-it-all who makes a living working online. She started her writing career in an attempt to make a little money in college, but she found the lifestyle too tempting to get rid of.

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